Posts Tagged ‘advising’

Proactive Advising with First-Generation Students: Suggestions for Practice

In recent years, first-generation students (students with parents/guardians who have not completed any college) have become an important population in higher education due to their increasing numbers. According to the U.S. Department of Education (2010), first-generation students make up almost 46% of first-year students in higher education. Alarmingly, this large group is also at high risk for attrition. Ishitani (2006) found these students are 1.3 times more likely than their peers to leave institutions in …

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Who or what informs your advising practice?

Many theories grounded in education and the social sciences provide the foundation for academic advising programs in higher education. As an advising practitioner or administrator, do you subscribe to a certain theory that you think is especially relevant and helpful? If so, please share. Is there a particular theorist who inspires the work you do and how you do it?

What is your opinion?

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Faculty Advising Fellows: Lessons Learned

Abstract

This paper explores the Faculty Advising Fellows program at a small regional university. The program began in 2007 to supplement the work of professional advisers. Focus groups and interviews involved Faculty Advising Fellows, professional staff advisers, and former Fellows, all of whom gave their perceptions of the program, addressed areas of strength, and discussed ways the program could be improved. This article also presents a short history of the advising process and gives the …

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The Importance of Advising Undergraduates in the Humanities

Last semester, a colleague who also advises undergraduate students confided in me that one of her students arrived for an appointment in distress. The student, a third-year humanities major, had been informed by an undergraduate adviser in a professional program that her liberal arts major was, essentially, useless. The student indicated to my colleague that, though she connected strongly to her major on an emotional and intellectual level, she felt she had no ammunition to …

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Description of a Team-based Intensive Advising Mentor Program at An Undergraduate Baccalaureate Nursing Program: From the Advisers’ Perspective

Introduction

There is a growing demand for baccalaureate-prepared nurses in the healthcare field. The Institute of Medicine (2010) called for an 80 percent increase of baccalaureate-prepared nurses. According to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, “… nursing schools across the country are struggling to expand capacity to meet the rising demand for care given the national move toward healthcare reform” (AACN, 2014, ¶ 1). The Council on Physician and Nurse Supply (2008) called for …

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Advice for a new advising colleague

New academic advisers have their hands full learning their institution’s academic policies and procedures, as well as familiarizing themselves with the day-to-day operations of their advising unit. On top of that, new advisers find themselves also developing their own advising styles, preferences, and routines. What tips would you give a new colleague to help him or her develop a personal advising approach and philosophy that is both meaningful and effective?

What is your opinion?

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How much should you include in advising notes?

Sometimes students’ unusual circumstances, personal challenges, or medical or emotional conditions warrant extra documentation that could help you or other advisers provide appropriate guidance/references and also help you monitor progress or anticipate difficulties. Should you include this kind of documentation in the official notes system or leave them out but perhaps “store” them in a private file? Does your advising unit have a protocol when handling sensitive information? What’s your opinion?

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Toward a Theory of Advising

This paper sets forth the main principles of a theory of advising. This theory, explained more fully later in the paper, holds advising to be fundamentally a learning activity in which students intentionally and reflectively integrate their academic learning into an education that is a coherent whole. I am calling it the integrative learning theory.

The theory itself is not entirely original to the present paper: it builds on work previously published by Hemwall and …

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Collaborating with Student Affairs and Other Campus Partners

A student’s total educational experience refers to his or her engagement with a range of college/university learning opportunities potentially encompassing course work as well as student life, academic advising, career planning, and perhaps volunteering, clubs, research, global citizenship, education abroad, and internships. How can academic advising centers, student affairs units, and other campus partners work together to guide students toward this total experience? Can you share specific examples or know of successful programs?

What’s your …

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Empowerment through Advising: Academic Advising in Individualized Major Programs

Individualized Major Programs (IMPs) offer a distinctively personal learning environment for undergraduate students, in which they develop their own curricula and forge new pathways of learning often structured by intensely “high touch” interactions with the faculty and staff of such programs. Among the many areas of IMPs that have been under-theorized is the relationship between the student and academic adviser. While diverse in structure and intent, all IMPs share the philosophical characteristic of empowering students …

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