Articles

The Mentor is Changing

The Mentor: An Academic Advising Journal is now The Mentor: Innovative Scholarship on Academic Advising. A full archive of articles published prior to 2018 will be maintained here on this website. However, please visit the journal’s new website at journals.psu.edu/mentor where you will find our most recent articles, information about submissions, and details about the journal’s mission of fostering innovative scholarship related to academic advising.

Read More …

Adviser and Faculty Perceptions of the Benefits and Feasibility of Intrusive Advising

Danie Schneider, MSED, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

Dr. Pietro Sasso, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

Laurel Puchner, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

Abstract

Intrusive advising requires the efforts and collaboration of faculty and academic advisers.  Research suggests (Miller & Murray, 2005; Schee, 2007) that students are more successful when they have more meaningful relationships with academic advisers and faculty.  This study compared the attitudes and perceptions about intrusive advising between faculty members and academic advisers at a …

Read More …

“That’s not what I said:” Communication gaps in advising

Ann Lieberman Colgan, Ed.D., West Chester University

Abstract

The ability to comprehend, act upon, and disseminate essential communication plays a critical part in student success in higher education. Yet many faculty, staff, and administrators can recollect dozens of stories about students who missed important information, and the resulting consequences ranged from hilarious to tragic. Therefore, academic advisers must read the signposts of missing comprehension; advisers must detect students’ selective hearing, partial reading, or limited grasp …

Read More …

Self-Authorship Theory: Using Challenge and Support to Inform One’s Advising Practice

Allison Quinn, University of St. Thomas

Abstract

Challenge and support: though a popular expression in the field of student affairs and especially in the functional area of academic advising, without a formal tie to student development theories these three words lack the substance to truly transform one’s academic advising practice. Therefore, this article serves as a reflective piece outlining how challenge and support can play a meaningful role in informal and formal advising settings. I …

Read More …

“Do You Understand What It Means to be Hungry?” Food Insecurity on Campus and the Role of Higher Education Professionals

Kate K. Diamond, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Michael J. Stebleton, Ph.D., University of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Food insecurity has become a growing concern in higher education. As more low-income and underrepresented students seek degrees—and tuition rates and student debt levels rise— educators are starting to take action (Bruening et al., 2016; Cady, 2014; Goldrick-Rab, 2016; Morris, Smith, Davis, & Null, 2016).  As scholar-practitioners, we first became aware of this issue during a qualitative study on the …

Read More …

Why Mentoring Matters: African-American Students and the Transition to College

Dr. Keonya Booker, College of Charleston, Ernest Brevard, Jr., College of Charleston

Abstract

At the postsecondary level, the process of mentoring involves academic guidance and social support. The purpose of this study was to explore how first-year African-American students experienced a year-long mentoring program at a mid-sized liberal arts college. Fifty-eight undergraduate African-American students were surveyed at the conclusion of the mentoring program. Findings revealed the majority of students regarded the mentoring program as worthwhile …

Read More …

What’s Your Story? A Narrative Approach to Advising

Louis E. Newman, Carleton College

When I first began advising, I didn’t have a “narrative approach.” Frankly, I didn’t have any approach at all. I no longer remember when or how it first began to dawn on me that advising was all about stories—my students’ and mine. I suppose it happened gradually, as most insights of this sort do. But focusing on stories is now so fully integrated into the way I think about advising …

Read More …

Resolving Ethical Dilemmas in Academic Advising through Core Values and Aspirational Principles

David J. Lutz, Missouri State University Austin T. Boon, Missouri State University Xiafei Xue, Missouri State University

Abstract

Academic advising has many goals and typically is assumed to operate in the best interests of students. However, the personal goals of advisers along with departmental and institutional priorities may compromise this focus, often without the awareness or certainly the intention of advisers. Scenarios demonstrating such ethical dilemmas are provided. Incorporating NACADA’s The Statement of Core Values …

Read More …

Crossing Rivers: Academic Advising Support for Immigrant College Students

Michael J. Stebleton, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Andile was a Black, non-traditional immigrant college student from Ethiopia who enrolled at a public, four-year institution. He majored in Human Services with the intent of pursuing a new career in education. In my role as an academic adviser, I had the honor of working with Andile for several years as he progressed toward his degree. Andile was born, raised, and educated in East Africa. He worked as …

Read More …

Proactive Advising with First-Generation Students: Suggestions for Practice

In recent years, first-generation students (students with parents/guardians who have not completed any college) have become an important population in higher education due to their increasing numbers. According to the U.S. Department of Education (2010), first-generation students make up almost 46% of first-year students in higher education. Alarmingly, this large group is also at high risk for attrition. Ishitani (2006) found these students are 1.3 times more likely than their peers to leave institutions in …

Read More …

 



     ISSN: 1521-2211