Articles

Self-Authorship Theory: Using Challenge and Support to Inform One’s Advising Practice

Allison Quinn, University of St. Thomas

Abstract

Challenge and support: though a popular expression in the field of student affairs and especially in the functional area of academic advising, without a formal tie to student development theories these three words lack the substance to truly transform one’s academic advising practice. Therefore, this article serves as a reflective piece outlining how challenge and support can play a meaningful role in informal and formal advising settings. I …

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“Do You Understand What It Means to be Hungry?” Food Insecurity on Campus and the Role of Higher Education Professionals

Kate K. Diamond, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Michael J. Stebleton, Ph.D., University of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Food insecurity has become a growing concern in higher education. As more low-income and underrepresented students seek degrees—and tuition rates and student debt levels rise— educators are starting to take action (Bruening et al., 2016; Cady, 2014; Goldrick-Rab, 2016; Morris, Smith, Davis, & Null, 2016).  As scholar-practitioners, we first became aware of this issue during a qualitative study on the …

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Why Mentoring Matters: African-American Students and the Transition to College

Dr. Keonya Booker, College of Charleston, Ernest Brevard, Jr., College of Charleston

Abstract

At the postsecondary level, the process of mentoring involves academic guidance and social support. The purpose of this study was to explore how first-year African-American students experienced a year-long mentoring program at a mid-sized liberal arts college. Fifty-eight undergraduate African-American students were surveyed at the conclusion of the mentoring program. Findings revealed the majority of students regarded the mentoring program as worthwhile …

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What’s Your Story? A Narrative Approach to Advising

Louis E. Newman, Carleton College

When I first began advising, I didn’t have a “narrative approach.” Frankly, I didn’t have any approach at all. I no longer remember when or how it first began to dawn on me that advising was all about stories—my students’ and mine. I suppose it happened gradually, as most insights of this sort do. But focusing on stories is now so fully integrated into the way I think about advising …

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Resolving Ethical Dilemmas in Academic Advising through Core Values and Aspirational Principles

David J. Lutz, Missouri State University Austin T. Boon, Missouri State University Xiafei Xue, Missouri State University

Abstract

Academic advising has many goals and typically is assumed to operate in the best interests of students. However, the personal goals of advisers along with departmental and institutional priorities may compromise this focus, often without the awareness or certainly the intention of advisers. Scenarios demonstrating such ethical dilemmas are provided. Incorporating NACADA’s The Statement of Core Values …

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Crossing Rivers: Academic Advising Support for Immigrant College Students

Michael J. Stebleton, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Andile was a Black, non-traditional immigrant college student from Ethiopia who enrolled at a public, four-year institution. He majored in Human Services with the intent of pursuing a new career in education. In my role as an academic adviser, I had the honor of working with Andile for several years as he progressed toward his degree. Andile was born, raised, and educated in East Africa. He worked as …

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Proactive Advising with First-Generation Students: Suggestions for Practice

In recent years, first-generation students (students with parents/guardians who have not completed any college) have become an important population in higher education due to their increasing numbers. According to the U.S. Department of Education (2010), first-generation students make up almost 46% of first-year students in higher education. Alarmingly, this large group is also at high risk for attrition. Ishitani (2006) found these students are 1.3 times more likely than their peers to leave institutions in …

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Marc Lowenstein and the Future of Academic Advising: The View from Penn State

This article consists of a report and commentary on Marc Lowenstein’s keynote address at Penn State’s Fourteenth Annual Professional Development Conference on Academic Advising held September 11, 2015.

Introduction

On Friday, September 11, 2015, I attended the Fourteenth Annual Professional Development Conference on Academic Advising at Penn State. There were 246 attendees, including advisers from all of Penn State’s satellite campuses and from other colleges and universities in Pennsylvania. The dean was happy to announce …

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Peer Mentors Use Narrative Storytelling as an Advising Tool to Facilitate Major/Career Exploration with First-Year Students

Introduction

In the Search for Education, Elevation and Knowledge (SEEK) Program, an educational opportunity program at The City College of New York, peer mentors work collaboratively with advisers to assist first-year students with major choice and career exploration. Peer mentors are academically successful students trained to work with first-year undergraduates in the first-year seminar. Mentors share their own narratives about choosing a major to model self-reflection, decision making, and help-seeking behavior. This article describes this …

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Proverbs and Parables: Advice that Sticks

We advisers wear many hats, including those of guidance counselor, motivator, cheerleader, and life coach. As such, we give many suggestions to students, ranging from the general—“keep trying,” “aim high, jump even higher,” “you can do it, go for it,” “manage your time well”—to the specific—“while studying or attending class, make sure to turn your phone off,” “go to every class,” “if you are an evening person, don’t sign up for an 8:00 a.m. class, …

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     ISSN: 1521-2211