Special Course Sections for Residents

Fall 2014

BI SC 003 (GN) - Environmental Science

Information for the BI SC 003 course.
Section Seats Day/Time Classroom Credits
010 6 M W 10:10 - 11:00 AM
F 10:10 - 11:00 AM
100 Thomas
106 Ag Sc & Ind
3

This general education course studies kinds of environments, past and present uses and abuses of natural resources, disposal of human wastes, and prospects for the future.

What BI SC 003 will do for you:

  • It will blow wide open your understanding of both yourself and the Earth.
  • It will allow you to explore the core course teachings, independently, via provocative readings and field studies.
  • It will offer you ways of directly experiencing the course teachings via weekly small-group explorations and dialogues.
  • It will free you from the hassle of TESTS because there are none!
  • It will, via an amazing collection of films, challenge your beliefs about life and death and everything in between, while also pointing to astounding possibilities.
  • It will fill you with juicy questions that may take a lifetime to answer.

CAS 100A (GWS) - Effective Speech

Information for the CAS 100A course.
Section Seats Day/Time Classroom Credits
002 25 M W F 1:25 - 2:15 PM 125 Thomas 3

This general education course studies the purposeful use of oral communication as a means of addressing practical problems, both professional and civic. It is designed to introduce students to principles of effective public speaking, implemented through the design and presentation of individual speeches and through practice in message analysis and evaluation. Class size is limited and class meetings involve considerable attention to developing public speaking skills through in-class activities, collaborative learning, peer critiques, and analysis of public speeches and other messages. At least three individual, graded speeches are required in this course. Additional presentations (graded or non-graded) may be required by some instructors. Course work may also include instruction and practice in group decision making. Assessment includes evaluation by examination (one or two; no final exam is given in the course) and by occasional quizzes and other activities, all of which emphasize the mastery and application of the conceptual content of the course. Public presentations are evaluated for content, organization, and presentation.

ECON 102 (GS) - Introductory Microeconomic Analysis and Policy

Information for the ECON 102 course.
Section Seats Day/Time Classroom Credits
009 12 T R 1:00 - 2:15 PM 108 Forum 3

Economics is the study of how people satisfy their wants in the face of limited resources. One way to think about economics is that it is a consistent set of methods and tools that is valuable in analyzing certain types of problems related to decision-making, resource allocation, and the production and distribution of goods and services. There are two main branches of economics, microeconomics, and macroeconomics. Macroeconomics is concerned with economy-wide factors such as inflation, unemployment, and overall economic growth. This course is about microeconomics. It deals with the behavior of individual households and firms and how government influences that behavior.

ENGL 015S (GWS) - Rhetoric and Composition

Information for the ENGL 015S course.
Section Seats Day/Time Classroom Credits
008 24 M W F 12:20 - 1:10 PM 308 Willard 3

This general education course involves instruction and practice in writing expository prose that shows sensitivity to audience and purpose. It also meets the University requirement for a first-year seminar.

Do you believe almost everything you read? Do you have trouble articulating why you believe what you believe? You are probably expecting English 015S to be an introductory writing class, and it is. However, its goal is much more extensive than simply improving your writing. The goal of English 015S is to help you to become more involved in your communities by critically evaluating others' arguments and constructing effective arguments yourself.

PSYCH 100 (GS) - Introductory Psychology

Information for the PSYCH 100 course.
Section Seats Day/Time Classroom Credits
001 12 M W F 9:05 - 9:55 AM 102 Forum 3

Psychology is a scholarly discipline, a scientific field, and a professional activity. Its overall focus is the scientific study of behavior and experience, and of associated mental and physiological processes. As a scholarly discipline, psychology represents a major field of study in academic settings, with an emphasis on theories and principles of behavior and experience. As a science, psychology is a domain of research in which investigators analytically and systematically study behavior and experience to develop theories and principles and to understand their application to real-world situations. As a profession, psychology involves the practical application of knowledge, skills, and techniques for enhancing well-being and quality of life, as well as solving or preventing individual and social problems. This course provides an overview of the field of psychology, including research, theory, and application. Specific topics include the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning, cognition, motivation and emotion, development, social cognition and social influence, personality and individual differences, and mental disorders and therapy. Content is presented through a combination of lectures, readings, and demonstrations. Evaluation is primarily on the basis of objective exams given in class. A major goal of the course is to show how questions within these areas are addressed through empirical research. The course introduces students to theories, research, and procedures used in psychological research and practice. It also promotes thinking about how students can apply this knowledge to enhance their lives. After taking this course students should be able to make more informed decisions about participating in future psychology courses and have a better understanding of psychology as a science and of human behavior. This course serves as a prerequisite for most upper-level psychology courses. It introduces basic concepts covered in more depth in those courses.

SOC 119 (GS;US) - Race and Ethnic Relations

Information for the SOC 119 course.
Section Seats Day/Time Classroom Credits
601 12 T R 4:15 PM - 5:30 PM
W 9:05 - 9:55 AM
100 Thomas
201 Osmond
4

This course has three objectives. First, the course will help you to think critically about issues related to race and ethnicity in American society. These issues include the meaning of race and ethnicity; the extent of racial and ethnic inequality in the U.S., the nature of racism, discrimination, and racial stereotyping; the pros and cons of affirmative action; the development of racial identity; differences between assimilation, amalgamation, and multiculturalism; and social and individual change with respect to race relations. The second objective is to foster a dialogue between you and other students about racist and ethnocentric attitudes and actions. The third objective is to encourage you to explore your own racial and ethnic identity and to understand how this identity reflects and shapes your life experiences.

Check the course out via the SOC 119 Trailer

THEA 102 (GA) - Fundamentals of Acting

Information for the THEA 102 course.
Section Seats Day/Time Classroom Credits
001 20 T R 9:45 - 11:00 AM 112 Theatre 3

Introduction to the art and craft of acting for non-theatre majors.

THEA 102 is not an acting course designed to develop fine actors; it is a course about acting. It aims to introduce the student to basic principles of the art and craft of acting, focusing on how and why actors do what they do to prepare for a performance less than on the attainment of performance skills themselves. Students in this course will tap their own powers of concentration, observation, creativity, and imagination. A major focus in the course is the development of the ability to analyze one's own work and the work of peers in the class. Problem-solving in solo, paired, and/or large group contexts is a daily requirement in class. This course is excellent for those interested in developing stronger communication/presentational skills and becoming aware of the potential of their verbal and nonverbal communication. These skills are important for everyone and may be especially helpful for students with an interest in education, advertising/public relations, marketing, law, language studies (e.g., English, communication arts and sciences, communication sciences and disorders, foreign languages) or politics, to name a few.

Spring 2014

RPTM 498D - Introduction to Backpacking Leadership

Information for the RPTM 498D course.
Section Seats Day/Time Classroom Credits
602 12 T 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM * Discover House Lounge 2

* Note: This course meets March 18, 25, April 1, 8, and 15 and includes an overnight trip the weekend of April 11-13.

This introductory backpacking leadership class will provide students with backpacking skills and group leadership skills for an overnight, three-season back country travel and camping experience in the Eastern U.S. The course objectives are to 1.) introduce backpacking skills, including pre-trip planning, selection, use and care of equipment, and back country travel techniques; 2.) educate participants about the value of leadership, teamwork, and communication; 3.) increase awareness about human impacts on the environment; 4.) develop a personal connection to the environment; and 5.) provide an opportunity for each student to practice leadership skills.

SOC 119 (GS;US) - Race and Ethnic Relations

Information for the SOC 119 course.
Section Seats Day/Time Classroom Credits
020 5 T R 4:15 PM - 5:30 PM
W 10:10 - 11:00 AM
100 Thomas
318 Sackett
4
032 5 T R 4:15 PM - 5:30 PM
R 10:10 - 11:00 AM
100 Thomas
320 Sackett
4
046 5 T R 4:15 PM - 5:30 PM
M 3:35 - 4:25 PM
100 Thomas
320 Sackett
4

This course has three objectives. First, the course will help you to think critically about issues related to race and ethnicity in American society. These issues include the meaning of race and ethnicity; the extent of racial and ethnic inequality in the U.S., the nature of racism, discrimination, and racial stereotyping; the pros and cons of affirmative action; the development of racial identity; differences between assimilation, amalgamation, and multiculturalism; and social and individual change with respect to race relations. The second objective is to foster a dialogue between you and other students about racist and ethnocentric attitudes and actions. The third objective is to encourage you to explore your own racial and ethnic identity and to understand how this identity reflects and shapes your life experiences.

Check the course out via the SOC 119 Trailer