Graduate Corner

The Graduate Corner showcases the research, analysis, and writings of developing authors enrolled in graduate programs. Their topics focus on academic advising in higher education and seek to introduce new advising ideas as well as contribute to the discussion within the academic advising profession.

From Tech School to a Four-Year Institution: Lessons Learned from Gamecock Gateway

More than 80 percent of today’s high school graduates will choose to attend college within eight years of graduating from high school and nearly half of them will attend a technical or community college prior to transferring to a four-year institution (Rising by degrees, 2014). Some decide to attend a technical college because the tuition is less, while others make this decision due to flexible class scheduling options. For students who are unsure of their …

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Advising and Engaging the “Working-Class” College Student

Since the U.S. economy crashed in 2008, institutions of higher education have generally increased tuition and fees to cover shortfalls in state funding and/or fundraising efforts. For example, tuition has increased nearly 60 percent at private colleges and doubled at public institutions during the past ten years (Clark & Wang, 2011). This tuition hike has forced many students to work part-time and/or full-time jobs to pay escalating tuition, fees, room, and board. According to King …

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Academic Advising in a Multicultural World

Tackling the advising profession with a homogeneous approach would be like offering only vanilla or chocolate at the local ice cream shop. Sure, there will be customers who want one or the other but serving more choices would help to satisfy everyone. Similarly, approaching advising relationships with the adviser’s own ethnocentricity as the sole guiding force will lead to a one-dimensional relationship. The importance of academic advising cannot be overstated. As Gordon (2002) suggested, “academic …

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Athletic Academic Advising for Revenue Sports: A Unique Challenge

Academic advising is a unique field in the sense that advisers often play multiple roles.  Some of the roles that are commonly associated with this discipline are mentor, guide, confidant, and teacher (Gordon, Habley, & Grites, 2008, p. 86). Academic advisers are presented with unique opportunities to form relationships with students with diverse backgrounds and circumstances. These backgrounds and circumstances include those of international students, students with disabilities, nontraditional students, first-generation college students, and student-athletes. …

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Prevalence of Mental Health Issues among College Students: How Do Advisers Equip Themselves?

An increasing number of students are arriving on college campuses with mental health issues (Hunt & Eisenberg, 2010). It is not uncommon for students to experience varying degrees of stress, anxiety, and depression during their time in college, inasmuch as they encounter both academic and non-academic stresses during their college experience. Some examples of non-academic stressors include personal relationships, work life, and family. Even a major life transition such as moving away from home to …

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Practical Considerations in Developing Peer Advising Programs

Academic advising typically consists of one-on-one relationships between students and faculty or staff members. However, in response to changing student populations and institutional needs, colleges and universities are reexamining their academic advising delivery systems (Self, 2008). One way of doing so is by using peer advisers and, in fact, the use of peer advising has grown in recent years. According to a February 2004 National Academic Advising Association survey, “over 65% of institutions surveyed have …

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The Unreachable Student: Techniques and Strategies to Increase the Influence of Academic Advising

As an undergraduate student, I rarely sought out my academic adviser. For a number of reasons, I really only interacted with an academic adviser when I was required or needed his or her signature. While enrolled in a recent seminar on academic advising, I began to reflect on these experiences. It is my belief that there is a particular group of unreachable students—those who do not seek out their advisers, rarely make appointments, and seldom …

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Moving into Student Spaces: Utilizing Conversations Outside the Office to Enhance Advising Sessions

As advisers, we strive to help our students excel in their studies, develop as the individuals they are, and move toward graduation to pursue their ventures. Our goal is to foster and facilitate student development. In order to be effective, we need to establish trust with our students so we can provide them with the appropriate guidance along the way. But what if advising in the office is putting a barrier between the adviser and …

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Advising Students in the Sciences

Introduction

Advising students interested in science-related fields of study can present challenges for the academic adviser. These challenges lie in the diverse characteristics, preparation, and personal goals of science students as well as the development of a positive and lasting student-adviser relationship. Establishing a positive adviser-student relationship should be a priority to any academic adviser or faculty member who advises, because student retention is positively correlated to this relationship (Levin & Hussey, 2007). Approximately 69 …

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Encouraging Student Success: Four-Year Plan Initiatives

Once admitted to college, students and their parents have to make a lot of choices and plans. These include what major to choose, what items to purchase for dorm living, and how to pay for the next four years of college. Considering the economy, earning a degree in four years is more important than ever. However, the reality at four-year institutions is that 38 percent of undergraduates will graduate in four years and only 61 …

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     ISSN: 1521-2211